3D viewing – an explanation

April 15th, 2010 by LG Blog UK
 

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Avatar has had a massive impact on the development of 3D as a technology, introducing a generation to film with an extra dimension. This demand is predicted to continue its meteoric rise this year as 3DTVs for the home hit the shelves in the UK next month in time for the FIFA world cup in South Africa in June.

Why do we need to wear glasses for 3D?

3D works by manipulating the way our eyes perceive images via a technique called stereoscopy.

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As the above image shows, stereoscopy works by providing different images to each eye, which combine to create the illusion of depth. Whether the source is cinema projectors, LCD or plasma TVs, or home projectors, there are currently two kinds of glasses – polarized type and shutter-type – that work in different ways to produce the stereoscopic effect.

Why do some people feel dizzy when watching 3D TV?

I’m sure everyone reading this will know someone who raves about 3D as the next big thing, whilst less of you may know someone who says that watching 3D makes them dizzy or nauseous. Well LG have stepped forward to explain why you may be feeling this way whilst watching 3D.

“When buying a TV, consumers typically consider aesthetic features such as screen size, design and thickness, or technical specifications including resolution, contrast rate and response time. When buying a 3D TV, however, such features as light intensity, “crosstalk” and the number of pixels become very important. Crosstalk takes place when any image intended for the right eye “leaks” into the left eye’s image, or vice versa. When this happens, viewers can feel dizzy.“

The good news for all of you who do feel dizzy whilst watching 3D is that glasses free 3D technology is in the pipeline, but it’s not expected for a few years yet.

We caught up with some of our competition winners at our recent 3D football pub event to hear their opinions after the match. For many of them it was their first experience of 3D and they left as 3D fans.

More info on LG’s full 3D range is available here


  • http://twitter.com/LG_Blog_France LG_Blog_France

    nice explanation !